Our website uses cookies so that we can provide a better browsing experience. Continue to use the site as normal, or find out how to manage cookies.

Chlamydia Gonorrhoea and Trichomonas

Chlamydia

Is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, which can damage a woman's reproductive organs. There may not be any symptoms with Chlamydia which is a real problem because if you don’t know you have it then it is not being treated. If Chlamydia is not treated it can make woman infertile, which means you can not have a baby. For men it can cause discharge from the penis.

Gonorrhoea

Is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrheoae. It affects both men and women and can infect the cervix, urethra, rectum, anus and throat. Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Trichomonas

Is an STI that is caused by the trichomonas vaginalis parasite that can affect both males and females but many people who get it don’t have any symptoms.

Symptoms

All three STIs have the same symptons which may include:

GIRLS

  • There might be a discharge (white/green/ cream stuff coming out of your vagina)
  • Pain when you pee 
  • You might have a bit of bleeding in between your periods
  • You could have pain when you have sex or just pain low in your belly or
  • you might not have any symptoms.

BOYS

  • Pain when you pee 
  • There might be a discharge (white/ green/ cream stuff from the tip of your penis) 
  • It might be sore or itch or burn around your penis 
  • Your balls might get swollen
  • You might not have any symptoms.

It is important to know that having discharge does not automatically mean you have an STI. Discharge can be caused by other things such as Thrush and Bacterial Vaginosis.

How do we test for Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea and Trichomonas?

In order to know what the infection is, we need to look for the bug which might be in your urine, sitting inside your vagina/penis or in the discharge if you have any. For this we need to get a sample from you.

When you come to see us or go anywhere in Hackney, you will get asked lots of questions to see if you have symptoms. If you do have symptoms, we will examine you. This is because sometimes it is possible to tell what the bug is by looking at you, we get a better sample when we look and also we might want to make sure you don't have Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

If you don't have symptoms: Boys, we will ask you to pee in a pot to see if we can see any bugs; Girls, we will ask you to get a swab from inside your vagina.

If you live in London you can now order a chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing kit by post, see www.checkurself.org.uk/for details.

What happens after you get tested?

It takes up to a week or two to get results back. We will work out what is the best way of contacting you; by phone/ txt, or by you coming back in.

If you have symptoms, you will be given antibiotics but it is important to come back for the results because we are just guessing at the bug. The results will tell us if you have been on the right antibiotics.

If you don't have symptoms, we will wait until we get the results before you are treated.

What is the treatment?

1. Antibiotics

These are tablets which fight the bugs. 
You can either take 4 tablets straight away or be given a course of antibiotics which you need to take every day for a week. These tablets can affect other medications you might be taking (like the pill or epilepsy tablets). Make sure you talk to the person who gives you the tablets to find out what to do.

2. Abstinence (no sex) for a week

This is because it takes that long to get rid of the bacteria (bug) whichever antibiotics you take. 
If you have sex in that week, you can still pass it on and also catch something else. 
If your partner is being treated, wait until a week after you have both been treated.

3. Treating your partner(s)

If your partner is not treated, they might have an STI that they don't know about. They could give it back to you.

Even if you don't have sex with them again, they may give it to others, who may spread it to even more people, and these people might spread it to even more people.The more people with STI's that are walking around, the more likely that you will get one again. It might seem a bit far fetched but that is why there are so many people with STIs today.

It is best to get treated at the same time as your partner.

When you are diagnosed with an STI, we can give you a contact slip. This is just a piece of paper to give to your current partner and any partner in the last 3 months. It just tells them that they have been a contact of an STI and they should get treated.